Childbirth Crowning

What is childbirth crowning? The term refers to the time when the baby’s head has pushed through the cervix and is about to enter the birth canal. During childbirth, crowning is indeed a special moment because it is when the baby’s head is visible. Crowning happens during the second stage of labor: crowning.

Crowning contractions

As the pushing continues, the baby starts to extend their head out, and move underneath the woman’s pubic bone. This stretches the perineum close to its capacity. By the time about 5 centimeters in diameter of the baby’s head can be seen, the previous pattern of ‘two steps forward, one step back’ changes. Now the baby’s head continues to advance slightly more with each contraction, but usually stays where it is after the contraction has stopped. This continues for a few contractions (or possibly only one contraction, if this is not your first baby) until the baby’s head ‘crowns’.

The burning or stinging sensation only lasts for a short time and is followed by a numb feeling. This is due to your baby’s head stretching your vaginal tissue so thin that the nerves are blocked. The result is a natural anesthetic.

Childbirth Crowning Experience

When your baby’s head crowns, you might experience a burning or stinging sensation, often referred to as “the ring of fire,” as your baby stretches the vaginal opening. To me it felt like my hand did when it was asleep and started waking up; a tingling and unpleasant sensation, but not unbearable. If you do feel a burning or stinging sensation, it only lasts for a short time and is followed by a numb feeling. This is due to your baby’s head stretching your vaginal tissue so thin that the nerves are blocked. The result is a natural anesthetic.

As soon as you feel that stretching sensation, your provider may ask you to stop pushing. You want to breathe the baby out, decreasing your risk of tearing.

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